Black, White, and Artisan All Over


Nothing is more timeless than black and white, but as Vogue points out, this traditional color scheme is getting a modern touch this spring/summer season with playful patterns popping up all over the runway. Not to be left out, we’ve collected our favorite black and white artisan fabrics. From zigzags to geometric shapes, black and white has never been more crisp and elegant—with just a touch of fun.



Bold, Grecian graphics and one-of-a-kind style dominate this black and white, block-printed sarong our Indian artisans made for Nordstrom (available here). 



TOP: Created with hand-carved wooden stamps, each zigzag is slightly due to the amount of pressure our Indian artisans applied during the block-printing process. BOTTOM LEFT: Hand-dyed in India, this fabric showcases our artisans’ take on a classic motif. BOTTOM RIGHT: Black, white, and gray stripes play nicely with hypnotic zigzags in this handwoven textile from Ghana. 



LEFT: Kate and Laura Mulleavy, the team behind Rodarte’s Spring 2014 RTW runway show, was inspired by 1980s Los Angeles club culture, with black and white tassels, hot pants, and silk shirts dominating the collection. RIGHT: Handwoven, black and white Indian ikat. 



LEFT: This circular, black and white pattern was hand-dyed by Indian artisans skilled in the block-printing technique. RIGHT: Taking her queue from safari life, Diane von Ferstenberg showcased animal-inspired prints with pops of orange at her Spring 2014 RTW show. 




The first of three Indian ikat scarves that we made in collaboration Madewell was released online yesterday—and we couldn’t be more excited! This project was especially meaningful for us because we were able to visit our artisan co-op just outside of Hyderabad, India during production. During our trip, we spent time with the artisan women who created these beautiful scarves and their families. It was a great reminder that the work we’re doing really does matter. Below are some visual highlights from our visit, and be sure to check out the entire Piece & Co. Madewell collection.

The first of three Indian ikat scarves that we made in collaboration Madewell was released online yesterday—and we couldn’t be more excited! This project was especially meaningful for us because we were able to visit our artisan co-op just outside of Hyderabad, India during production. During our trip, we spent time with the artisan women who created these beautiful scarves and their families. It was a great reminder that the work we’re doing really does matter. Below are some visual highlights from our visit, and be sure to check out the entire Piece & Co. Madewell collection.

Here at Piece & Co., we’re in love with ikat! And so are many of the brands we work with, including Madewell and Rachel Roy. So what makes this centuries-old textile so lovable? Well, its versatility for starters. Throughout the years, we’ve seen ikat turned into hats, scarves, pillows, bags, and even ties. But the true reason we’re such big fans has to do with the hard work behind it. To make ikat, artisans use bindings, such as knots or rubber ties, to protect portions of the fabric during the dyeing process, which creates a desired pattern on the yarn before it’s woven into fabric. Each of our artisan groups differs in their approach to ikat because techniques can vary by country or region. But the end result is still the same: a stylish and unique textile that can be used in myriad ways. We dive into the Indian ikat process to highlight just how lovable ikat really is. Indian ikat 101 »

Here at Piece & Co., we’re in love with ikat! And so are many of the brands we work with, including Madewell and Rachel Roy. So what makes this centuries-old textile so lovable? Well, its versatility for starters. Throughout the years, we’ve seen ikat turned into hats, scarves, pillows, bags, and even ties. But the true reason we’re such big fans has to do with the hard work behind it. To make ikat, artisans use bindings, such as knots or rubber ties, to protect portions of the fabric during the dyeing process, which creates a desired pattern on the yarn before it’s woven into fabric. Each of our artisan groups differs in their approach to ikat because techniques can vary by country or region. But the end result is still the same: a stylish and unique textile that can be used in myriad ways. We dive into the Indian ikat process to highlight just how lovable ikat really is. Indian ikat 101 »

From Chanel to Céline, pop-inspired fashions are sprouting up everywhere this spring season. Splashes of vibrant colors mixed with abstract shapes are just what we like to see after a long, cold winter. Although Avant Pop pulls from modern influences and popular icons, it’s amazing how much this trend coincides with the work we’re producing with our artisans all across the globe. Their timeless techniques—from tie dye to batik to block printing—surprisingly translate to the pop movement, whether that’s through styles inspired by street art or abstract expressionism. Here’s a roundup of our favorite Avant Pop styles and artisan fabrics for spring.

TOP: Prada’s Spring 2014 RTW collection by designer Miuccia Prada showcases a range of abstract fashions that are reminiscent of mural street art. The activist-designer wanted to make a political statement with these bold pieces, according to Style.com, saying, ”I want to inspire women to struggle.” BOTTOM: This fabric, handcrafted by our artisans in Ghana, was created using the batik dyeing technique. The blocks of color were produced by applying melted wax to the fabric to form a resistant when the material was completely immersed in dye. 

TOP LEFT: Jil Sanders’s Spring/Summer 2014 collection veered from the designer’s traditionally quiet pieces by featuring bright prints with chaotic colors. According to ElleUK.com, the designer was inspired by Alighiero Boetti’s ‘riddles of space’. TOP RIGHT: Raf Simons’s Spring 2014 RTW collection for Dior was “a celebration of the artificial and the real,” highlighting both floral and abstract prints. “I wanted a sense this season of a particular group of women, a distinct new tribe, sophisticated and savage at the same time,” says Simons. BOTTOM: This Pollock-esque material was dyed using the batik method (mentioned above) by our artisans in Ghana. 

LEFT AND TOP RIGHT: We’re all about fashion that stands for something! Carol Lim and Humberto Leon’s Spring 2014 collection for Kenzo was centered around a sea-and-surf theme to bring attention to environmental cause of overfishing. BOTTOM RIGHT: This ocean colored fabric was crafted by our Indian artisans using the Shibori hand-dyeing technique. 

TOP LEFT: Royal hues reign in this hand-dyed, batik fabric made in Togo. TOP RIGHT: Indian artisans used a dip-dye technique to create this subtle yet distinctive mauve-green textile. BOTTOM LEFT: Reminiscent of artist Barnett Newman, this abstract fabric was tie dyed by our Indian artisans.  BOTTOM RIGHT: Neutral, sky tones dominate this ikat material from India. 
Want to see more? Contact Piece & Co. »

From Chanel to Céline, pop-inspired fashions are sprouting up everywhere this spring season. Splashes of vibrant colors mixed with abstract shapes are just what we like to see after a long, cold winter. Although Avant Pop pulls from modern influences and popular icons, it’s amazing how much this trend coincides with the work we’re producing with our artisans all across the globe. Their timeless techniques—from tie dye to batik to block printing—surprisingly translate to the pop movement, whether that’s through styles inspired by street art or abstract expressionism. Here’s a roundup of our favorite Avant Pop styles and artisan fabrics for spring.


image

TOP: Prada’s Spring 2014 RTW collection by designer Miuccia Prada showcases a range of abstract fashions that are reminiscent of mural street art. The activist-designer wanted to make a political statement with these bold pieces, according to Style.com, saying, ”I want to inspire women to struggle.” BOTTOM: This fabric, handcrafted by our artisans in Ghana, was created using the batik dyeing technique. The blocks of color were produced by applying melted wax to the fabric to form a resistant when the material was completely immersed in dye. 


image

TOP LEFT: Jil Sanders’s Spring/Summer 2014 collection veered from the designer’s traditionally quiet pieces by featuring bright prints with chaotic colors. According to ElleUK.com, the designer was inspired by Alighiero Boetti’s ‘riddles of space’. TOP RIGHT: Raf Simons’s Spring 2014 RTW collection for Dior was “a celebration of the artificial and the real,” highlighting both floral and abstract prints. “I wanted a sense this season of a particular group of women, a distinct new tribe, sophisticated and savage at the same time,” says Simons. BOTTOM: This Pollock-esque material was dyed using the batik method (mentioned above) by our artisans in Ghana. 


image

LEFT AND TOP RIGHT: We’re all about fashion that stands for something! Carol Lim and Humberto Leon’s Spring 2014 collection for Kenzo was centered around a sea-and-surf theme to bring attention to environmental cause of overfishing. BOTTOM RIGHT: This ocean colored fabric was crafted by our Indian artisans using the Shibori hand-dyeing technique. 


image

TOP LEFT: Royal hues reign in this hand-dyed, batik fabric made in Togo. TOP RIGHT: Indian artisans used a dip-dye technique to create this subtle yet distinctive mauve-green textile. BOTTOM LEFT: Reminiscent of artist Barnett Newman, this abstract fabric was tie dyed by our Indian artisans.  BOTTOM RIGHT: Neutral, sky tones dominate this ikat material from India. 

Want to see more? Contact Piece & Co. »